Sunday, April 19, 2009

"Thanks but No Thanks ..."

Today I got a call from a Post Dispatch sales person wanting me to extend and expand my subscription (I get only the weekend papers now). I said I was not interested in subscribing any more because the paper's managers fired Sylvester Brown. I told him I thought the paper was totally wrong to do that and it was unforgivable. I feel sorry for the sales people. They have to make a living too, but I will not support a company that behaves in such a sleazy, back-handed way. I will start reading Sylvester's blog. From what I've heard, hard copies of newspapers are on the way out anyway. -- Susan Cunningham

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dear Sylvester,

Like so many others, I was very upset to learn that you were no longer writing at the Post-Dispatch, due to a very unfair decision by the management.

I love your columns because you are one of the few journalists in St. Louis not afraid to tell it like it is about our government and our elected officials. But you also listened thoughtfully and respectfully to those who disagreed with you and sung the praises of those who are trying to create change and are not recognized nearly enough.

I want to thank you for inspiring so many young people. You will be happy to know that one of the young men at YouthBuild St. Louis that you mentored, Marcus, is doing well. He is working two jobs and has come a long way towards a happy and productive life. He says that your guidance really helped him. The exciting Bill Cosby event that you spearheaded and hosted is another example of the positive impact you have had on St. Louis.

Sylvester, I look forward to reading your books and future articles and learning of your next venture in producing the kind of journalism/writing that this country so desperately needs.

I remain one of your greatest fans,

Joyce Sonn

vavaughn said...

I had a 40 year daily newspaper delivery addiction. I have been clean for one week. The cramps have passed and the finger nails are beginning to grow back. Is it possible to hear silent empathy? When I cancelled my subscription, the sales person offer me the Sunday edition for $1 a month. When I responded that my cancellation was a response to Sylvester's firing, there was a long silence before "Your subscription has been cancelled."

mindy said...

I'm so glad you are over the detox, Vavaughn - that's the toughest! I detoxed a couple of years ago and just read online, but I usually read only Sylvester and Bill. Now it's only Bill. If only I had a subscription to cancel in anger - I definitely would!

Anonymous said...

Dear Sylvester,

I was dumbfounded when I saw the tease for your news conference on TV last week. I am so sorry for you that the Post-Dispatch made the terrible decision to let you go. What on earth is the paper thinking?? As your self-professed biggest fan in Sullivan, Missouri, I am just at a loss.

Keep up the good fight. For what it's worth, after I expressed my view that your firing was a huge loss for both StL and the P-D on "Donnybrook Your Turn" last Thursday, two patrons of the Sullivan Public Library (where I am the director) made special trips in to tell me how much they agreed with my call.

My family and I look forward to you finding your next gig and hope it is in St. Louis. Your ability to express your views has expanded mine. Best of luck and thanks a lot for the years of columns!

Sincerely, Mark Smith /Sullivan, MO

Anonymous said...

Just got off the phone with the PD myself. Our daily subscription is up, and they wanted to talk to us about renewing. I explained that since they've gotten rid of you and Eric Mink I don't see a reason to renew, and that I was particularly upset about they way you were treated. I don't want to support a paper that treats its employees so shabbily. I asked them to make sure the reason for my non-renewal was noted. The salesperson was very nice, sounded pretty weary to be honest, and said she would note my concerns. Not sure it did any good, but it felt good to get rid of the subscription and air my concerns.
Lisa Granich-Kovarik